wright in los angeles

The Things Architects Do #4: Reuse, Recycle, Reprise

Frank Lloyd Wright

elizabeth noble apartments

1929

falldraw1936

1936

184c8f70-8f58-4224-8d6a-3e22deaebafd

1946

massarohouse1

1949

1952

SANAA

2006

2006

flower house

2006

熊本駅東口広場西沢立衛 / Ryue Nishizawa2011

2007

sanaa1

2009

2009

Bibliothek-rolex-1

2010

MVRDV

2004

2004

2010

2010

mvrdv_expo2000

2000

2184136604_1ce2ca4982

2007

TADAO ANDO

000830

1995

library _of_childrens_literature_11

2002

OMA

death star

2007

Waterfront-City-Render2

2007

Arata Isozaki

8.ClustersintheAir

1962

qatar national library

2006

If you post a comment with your suggestions for further additions to this post, I’ll search them out and add them. I’ve only just scratched the surface here. I’m particularly interested in those ideas that architects recycle and reuse until they either succeed with it or die trying. The unbuilt works of Frank Lloyd Wright are rich in examples of this type. Also welcome are examples of architects continually reprising their greatest hits (e.g. SANAA, FLW again) – until they descend into self-parody (e.g. Daniel Libeskind).   

One thought on “The Things Architects Do #4: Reuse, Recycle, Reprise

  1. Graham McKay Post author

    Someone used the suggestion box to make the following comment.

    Comment: interesting conceptual designs.
    My small understanding of landscaping and landscape architecture has taught that most deciduous trees have root balls as large as the leaf balls. They also require birds, insects, bacteria to grow and prosper.
    Might these buildings with the trees be a problem or create problems?

    It’s true of course. When the architects mentioned that the maintenance of the trees would be outsourced, I assumed that this would include pruning of the branches AND the roots. Like bonsai, these trees will require constant and specialized care to stay undersized. I imagine that birds and insects will come naturally and in ways that are probably unpredictable and that might not always be pleasant, but we’ll never know unless somebody does it first. For treeless areas, its worth a shot but for places with open space around them, I’d rather the trees be in the ground where they can do their stuff in ways that we’re used to. Call me old fashioned …

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