Skip to content

Category: MISFITS

people whose contribution to better performing buildings has not been fully appreciated


Categories:

Architecture Misfits #27: The Analog Student

Architecture Misfits #27: The Analog Student
Post date:
Author:

If Architecture itself is a myth then what are architecture students supposed to believe in? Architectural education is often thought to be reactionary and unresponsive to market forces but my perception is that it’s attuned all too well. There’s no shortage of digital students who’ve picked up on image and perception management being everything. For them, architecture is an endless learning curve […]

Categories:

Architcture Misfits #26: Asnago Vender

Architcture Misfits #26: Asnago Vender
Post date:
Author:

That’s Claudio Vender [1904–1986] on the left and Mario Asnago [1896–1981] on the right. We can tell from the photograph that these two gentlement are stylish but haven’t been contemporary for quite some time. Their buildings however, remain both. You won’t find much information on them or their buildings. Here’s a bit from the NY site of furniture company Flexform. Both […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfit #25: Ernst May

Architecture Misfit #25: Ernst May
Post date:
Author:

Ernst May [July 1886 — September 1970] New Frankfurt [in German, Neues Frankfurt] was an affordable public housing program in Frankfurt started in 1925 and completed in 1930. The mayor of Frankfurt hired Ernst May as general manager of the project to bring together architects to work on it. The goal was housing that could be rented for no more than 25% of a person’s […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfits #24: Rural Studio

Architecture Misfits #24: Rural Studio
Post date:
Author:

A 308 sq.ft Katrina Cottage can be delivered for $70,000 including construction. That works out at $227/sq.ft.    The affordable IVRV House designed by SCI-ARC students for a low-income Los Angeles neighbourhood was constructed for $200,000 ÷ 1,185 sq.ft = US$165/sq.ft.   The 2015 house designed by Yale architecture students as part of the Jim Vlock Building Project was 1,000 sq.ft […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfit #23: André Lurçat

Architecture Misfit #23: André Lurçat
Post date:
Author:

André Lurçat was born three years after Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris and died five years after Le Corbusier’s final swim. Lurçat was not only a French modernist architect active over the same period, but also a landscape architect, furniture designer, urban planner and founding member of CIAM. His and Le Corbusier’s careers were mostly parallel until the late 1920s when they diverged as much as it is […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfits #22: H Arquitectes

Architecture Misfits #22: H Arquitectes
Post date:
Author:

For too long, Lacaton & Vassal have been the only living architecture misfits, consistently producing buildings of high utility, great economy and stark beauty. H Arquitectes readily admit to being influenced by Lacaton & Vassal and their readiness to acknowledge it immediately marks them as different. Their Casa Gualba appeared in the Dec. 2012 post The New Architecture of Austerity. It’s time for a better look at what H […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfit #21: Tōgō Murano

Architecture Misfit #21: Tōgō Murano
Post date:
Author:

Some of the buildings of Tōgō Murano [村野 藤吾] are incomprehensible and indescribably beautiful at the same time. It makes me want to believe in architecture as Art. My personal cynic tells me that positing the existence of a higher logic is primitive human response to anything resisting easy comprehension, but still … Some of Togo Murano’s designs resist […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfit #20: Edward T. Potter

Architecture Misfit #20: Edward T. Potter
Post date:
Author:

Another New York post. We can call this one Serious New York, or perhaps New York in the Time of Cholera. The link between poor housing and diseases such as yellow fever and cholera was established in 1820 by a Dr. Richard Pennell but squalid conditions in tenements continued to result in major outbreaks in 1822, 1823, 1832 and 1834 and even larger […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfit #19: Illarion Ivanov-Schitz

Architecture Misfit #19: Illarion Ivanov-Schitz
Post date:
Author:

Since 2010, misfits’ architecture has identified eighteen architecture misfits who seem to have little in common. Not all are or were architects. No.16: Douglas Haskell, had a life in architecture, but mostly as journalist and commentator. No.5: The Futurists, had little interest in architecture but nevertheless managed to greatly influence it. No.1: Hannes Meyer, No.2: Irving Gill, No.8: Hassan Fathy, and No.12: Nader Khalili, […]

Categories:

Honorary Architecture Misfits: Bernd and Hilla Becher

Honorary Architecture Misfits: Bernd and Hilla Becher
Post date:
Author:

The header image was also the header image for yesterday’s post on lighthouses. It’s from a book Coastwise Lights of China: an illustrated account of the Chinese Maritime Customs Lights Service by T. Roger Banister, published in 1932. You can read more about the book here. This image though, says the same thing I used 1,500 words to describe. Earlier this evening, […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfit #18: Ignazio Gardella

Architecture Misfit #18: Ignazio Gardella
Post date:
Author:

Ignazio Gardella (March 30, 1905 – March 16, 1999) The following list of buildings isn’t comprehensive but it should provide a flavour. 1934-38 Dispensario Antitubercolare, Alessandria 1944 The Milano-Verde (Green Milan) Plan 1944-47 Casa del Viticultore 1946–1953 Casa Tognella, also known as Casa al Parco 1947-54 Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea 1952 Casa Borsalino, Alessandria 1953-58 Casa alle Zattere, Venice 1958 Mensa Olivetti, Ivrea. […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfit #17: Moisei Ginzburg

Architecture Misfit #17: Moisei Ginzburg
Post date:
Author:

This fails to mention Ginzburg “came into contact” with The Futurists during his time in Milan. As a 20-year old architecture student, it’s unlikely he’d have been hanging out with them but, in arty circles Marinetti would’ve been as difficult to avoid as Alma Mahler in Vienna. Ginzburg disagreed with The Futurists’ total rejection of history because, for […]

Categories:

Architecture Misfit #16: Douglas Haskell

Architecture Misfit #16: Douglas Haskell
Post date:
Author:

Douglas Putnam Haskell (1899 –1979) For much of the mid 20th century, Douglas Haskell had a voice in the major architectural and urban debates of the day. As writer and editor, he weighed in on events and issues ranging from the 1932 International Style exhibition at MOMA to Expo ‘67 in Montreal, from public housing to suburban communities, […]

Categories:

Honorary Architecture Misfit: Kiyonori Kikutake

Honorary Architecture Misfit: Kiyonori Kikutake
Post date:
Author:

When Pasadena Heights was published in 新建築 in March 1975, the announcement included a statement from its architect, Kiyonori Kikutake. Now, try to imagine any contemporary architect A) announcing a project six months after its completion and B) that announcement containing a SELF-CRITICAL ANALYSIS of the strengths and weaknesses of the project, an APOLOGY for publishing a building before they thought it ready, and an […]