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Category: MISFITS

people whose contribution to better performing buildings has not been fully appreciated


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Architecture Misfit #15: Knud Peter Harboe

Architecture Misfit #15: Knud Peter Harboe
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Architecture Misfit #14 was Eladio Dieste, back in March 2014. There’s not many out there. Here’s one more. Knud Peter Harboe (2 november 1925 i København – 27 oktober 2002) var en dansk arkitekt og professor. There’s very little information to be found but we can learn a lot from a few drawings and images. Here’s a list of Harboe’s works translated from Danish wikipedia. Own […]

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Architecture Misfit #14: Eladio Dieste

Architecture Misfit #14: Eladio Dieste
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Eladio Dieste (1917 – 2000) Eladio Dieste was a Uruguayan engineer and architect who made his reputation building a range of structures from grain silos, factory sheds, markets and churches, all in Uruguay and all of exceptional elegance. I can’t say it better than that. Or this. Dieste, was one of the few Modernist architects [working in […]

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Architecture Misfit #13: Georg Muche

Architecture Misfit #13: Georg Muche
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Georg Muche  (8 May 1895 – 26 March 1987) Why’s he here? Basically, for not being Walter Gropius. 1895 Born 1914 Failed the entrance examination to the Royal Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts. 1915 Moved to Berlin, resumed study of painting.   1916-1918 Taught painting at the Sturm Art School; Participated in three exhibitions 1913–1923 […]

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Architecture Misfit #12: Nader Khalili

Architecture Misfit #12: Nader Khalili
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Nader Khalili (1936–2008) Nader Khalili is a good example of an architecture misfit. He really only had one idea. Put whatever sandy stuff is available, into bags, clad it and bingo you have a structure. In 1984 NASA was suitably impressed. In 1984, Lunar and Space habitation became an integral part of his work. He […]

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Architecture Misfit #11: Laurie Baker

Architecture Misfit #11: Laurie Baker
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This is not Laurie Baker. It is Charles Correa. A first draft of this post was about him because, since he announced his retirement earlier this year, I’ve been reading much about him as a man of the people coming up with ideas for low-cost buildings in India. He’s been receiving much attention in both […]

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Architecture Misfit #10: Colin Lucas

Architecture Misfit #10: Colin Lucas
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Colin Anderson Lucas (1906–84) was an English architect and pioneer of reinforced-concrete construction. He formed a company to build concrete structures in the style of International Modernism, including Noah’s House at Spade Oak Reach, Bourne End, Bucks. (1930), and Hop Field House, St Mary’s Platt, Wrotham, Kent (1933—with Amyas Connell and Basil Ward (1902–76). In 1933 […]

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Architecture Misfit #9: Karel Teige

Architecture Misfit #9: Karel Teige
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Meet Karel Teige. Karel Teige was the major figure of the Czech avant-garde movement Devětsil in the 1920s, a graphic artist, photographer, and typographer. Teige also worked as an editor and graphic designer for Devětsil’s monthly magazine ReD. The internet has taken a fancy to his surreal collages. Here’s one of my favourites – just the […]

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Architecture Misfit #8: Hassan Fathy

Architecture Misfit #8: Hassan Fathy
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Hassan Fathy (1900 – 1989) Hassan Fathy was responsible for 160 projects from houses and schools to large-scale communities. His most major work was the building of the village of New Gourna (1948-1952), near Luxor, Egypt, without the use of modern and expensive materials such as steel and concrete. This project was documented in his 1969 book Architecture for the […]

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Architecture Misfits #7: Lacaton & Vassal

Architecture Misfits #7: Lacaton & Vassal
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When misfits finally gets around to writing the definitive history of sustainable architecture, it will bypass all the media-hogging and resource-wasting architecture of the twentieth century and instead feature many of the architects mentioned in this blog. Irving Gill deserves a place for this following statement he made around 1915. If the cost of unimportant […]

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Architecture Misfit #6: George Fred Keck

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Just when I said that there weren’t any more 20C misfits, along comes George Fred Keck!  This image is of his Crystal House. It was built for Chicago’s 1933 “Homes of Tomorrow Exhibition” where [a] handful of architects and manufacturers was charged with designing housing prototypes that would conceptualize ways in which new technologies could change […]

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Architecture Misfits #5: The Futurists

Architecture Misfits #5: The Futurists
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The futurists were misfits in more ways than one. They had a manifesto – a written statement of what they believed in. The modern equivalent would, I suppose, be the “vision statement” that we see in business plans – only with more poetry to it. Here’s their point #7, for example. We declare that the splendor […]

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Architecture Misfit #4: Adolfo Natalini

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“…if design is merely an inducement to consume, then we must reject design; if architecture is merely the codifying of bourgeois model of ownership and society, then we must reject architecture; if architecture and town planning is merely the formalization of present unjust social divisions, then we must reject town planning and its cities…until all […]

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Architecture Misfit #3: Eileen Gray

Architecture Misfit #3: Eileen Gray
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Eileen Gray 1878 –1976: Here’s a good blogpost with a quick bio and here’s another one with pics of most of her important work. In the shallow fiction that is architectural history, she gets namechecked for designing this house, E1027. E1027 is in a nice little corner of the world. Cap Martin, French Riviera.  43°45’35.57″N   7°27’47.38″E That’s Monaco […]

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Architecture Misfit #2: Irving John Gill

Architecture Misfit #2: Irving John Gill
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Irving John Gill [1870–1936] Irving Gill had no formal education in architecture and never attended college. His father was a builder who, according to William Curtis’s “Modern Architecture Since 1900”, “had a knack for finding short cuts in construction”.  Curtis goes on to say that Gill himself was an early advocate of reinforced concrete in domestic […]