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Tag: other ways of understanding architecture


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Career Case Study #13: John Cyril Hawes

Career Case Study #13: John Cyril Hawes
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It’s not often we find architect and priest on the same CV but that’s the case with John Cyril Hawes. There’s a website, Monsignor John Hawes, from which I’ve summarized much of the following biographical information. Hawes was born in 1876 in Richmond in London but Canterbury Cathedral in the town of Canterbury where he […]

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The Floating World: Part II

The Floating World: Part II
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It’s not just houses. No building is spared from Japan’s memory loss when it comes to its own architectural history. Earlier this year, there was a bit of a stir when it was announced Kenzo Tange’s 1964 Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium would be demolished, the given reason being that the then innovative suspension roof was in […]

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The Future of BIM as an Active Driver of Industry Change (Part 2)

The Future of BIM as an Active Driver of Industry Change (Part 2)
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RECAP: The first part of this post ended with an overview of how roles within the building design and construction industry have changed to streamline the process but with competition for control of the BIM model. This is not control for control’s sake but can be justified in terms of higher quality, quicker response to […]

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The Future of BIM as an Active Driver of Industry Change

The Future of BIM as an Active Driver of Industry Change
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This, the first post of 2022 is a joint effort between Mohammad Saad Ahmad, an Estimator at Versus Construction in the Greater New York City area and myself. In our respective ways, we are both industry observers. We’ve all watched BIM become mainstream and our relationship to it evolve and but, until even until relatively […]

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The New Inhumanism

The New Inhumanism
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It’s almost twelve months to the day since I scared myself reading a 2013 book that, it was claimed, re-theorized Post Modernism. “FML,” I thought, “of all the things that need new life breathed into them, we get this one!” Anxiously watching for further signs, I began a draft. About the book, The Graham Foundation wrote [underlines mine]: […]

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US 7,540,120

US 7,540,120
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US7540120 is a United States patent for a Multi-Level Apartment Building. Patent attorneys aren’t likely to be apartment plan geeks so I pity the one whose desk this landed on. Perhaps I shouldn’t, because patent attorneys are skilled in untangling real novelty from mere claims to it. They also understand the importance of precise language because patent language is designed to accurately […]

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Skin Deep

Skin Deep
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Pallasmaa, Juhani “The Eyes of The Skin: Architecture and The Senses“, 2nd Edition, Wiley-Academy, 2005 It’s easy to see why this book is essential reading in many schools. It makes architecture sound like a very noble pursuit. Its argument is simple. Western culture has, since the Greeks, emphasised our sense of vision to the neglect of our other ones. […]

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Pietro Lingeri and the New Realism

Pietro Lingeri and the New Realism
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New Realism implies a Realism just as Neo-rationalism implies a Rationalism, or Post Modernism a Modernism that once was. They’re all moveable feasts. Neorealism we know from Italian cinema, the most widely-known films being Obsessione (1943), Rome, Open City (1945) and Bicycle Theives (1948). Neorealism kept it real and gritty but, as the memory and reality of WWII […]

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Architectural Assimilation

Architectural Assimilation
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“Architecturally, nothing can be said about it” is what we hear when there’s no fallback context. For most people this is a truism but it’s really only a tautology. Not having a context for understanding a building as architecture means it can’t be architecture. This’d be no problem if it weren’t for the inconvenient fact that buildings with no value as Architecture can still have value for humanity. […]