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Tag: perception management follows development gain


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The Historic Façade

The Historic Façade
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New buildings are usually proposed for reasons of development gain but people remain attached to old buildings because of familiarity, sense of historical continuity, and sometimes even for showing a level of craft and attention to detail unthinkable now. The perfect developer/architectural product would have all the development gain of a new building combined with […]

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The Architect as Ornament

The Architect as Ornament
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It is the pervading law of all things organic and inorganic, of all things physical and metaphysical, of all things human and all things superhuman, of all true manifestations of the head, of the heart, of the soul, that the life is recognizable in its expression, that form ever follows function. This is the law.“ This […]

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The Old Guard and The New Decency

The Old Guard and The New Decency
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The Elizabethan structure that was to become Highclere Castle was given a Georgian makeover in the early 19th century and then, over 1838–1878, another one to become what we know it as today. The point of both exercises was to update the building to bring it into line with contemporary notions of functionality and beauty. Everyone seems to […]

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The History of Forgetting

The History of Forgetting
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All buildings begin as architectural fantasies and perhaps one in a thousand or more get built. In addition to us hearing more and more about the ones that don’t or never will, a steady stream of updates – “X tower receives planning permission!” “Y tower topped out!” – accompanies those that do. Conditioned to living in perpetual anticipation, […]

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Architecture Myths #24: Beauty vs. Everything Else

Architecture Myths #24: Beauty vs. Everything Else
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MA: “Let me first thank you, Signor Palladio, for agreeing to this interview. To kick things off, would you like to share with misfits’ readers your thoughts on windows?” AP: “If the windows are made smaller and less numerous than necessary, the rooms will be made gloomy; and if they are made too large the rooms are practically uninhabitable because, since […]

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Different Strokes

Different Strokes
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It’s not just the Chinese authorities who are fed up with novelty buildings. I hope they’ve learned their lesson. I fear however, that the recent Chinese edict will only serve to drive symbolic references underground. Downplayed symbolism was already evident in, for example, Pritzker Prizers Zaha Hadid for ‘pebbles on a stream’ Guangzhou Opera House and Toyo Ito […]

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Brands as Architectural Legacy

Brands as Architectural Legacy
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I never expected to look back at the 1990’s and think it was a kinder, gentler era. Behind the Postmodern FacadeArchitectural Change in Late Twentieth-Century AmericaMagali Sarfatti Larson, 1993 How architecture has changed and how the systems for its production have changed along with it is an important topic but the book itself is somewhat dated. This post will attempt […]

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Imagery as Architecture

Imagery as Architecture
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It’s not just me who’s thankful the most egregious examples of CAD architecture will never get built, but it’s pointless being thankful if we’ve already imagined them. It’s entered our lives already and is already as real as it ever needs to be. When imagery of architectural propositions is debated, discussed and consistently reacted to as if it were real, […]

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The Parametric Bottom Line

The Parametric Bottom Line
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The ability to react quickly to design changes was one of the huge benefits CAD brought to this business of designing buildings. Even the clunkiest of programs automated drafting to manage it to some degree. It’s not that architects suddenly had time on their hands. The pace of work quickened and fast design became the new normal. BIM extended […]

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Moneymaking Machines #5: 100 East 53’rd Street

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The building known as 100 East 53’rd Street stands behind the hallowed Seagram Building which, at $36 mil. (not inc. tax) was the most expensive building in the world when completed in 1958. This is $300 mil. in today’s money. $36 mil. construction cost ÷ 830,000 sq.ft lettable  area = $43/sq.ft. and is equivalent to $360/sq.ft today even though 2,376 sq.ft recently rented at […]

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The Things Architects Do #10: Pull Out All Stops

The Things Architects Do #10: Pull Out All Stops
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“Pull out all stops” is one of those many curious English-language idioms that seem to exist to torment learners despite hardly anyone ever using them. This one is derived from an organist pulling out all stops on a church organ in order to deliver the full force of its sound. The stops are those knobs on the left […]

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Moneymaking Machines #4: 2 World Trade Center

Moneymaking Machines #4: 2 World Trade Center
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BIG’s design for Two World Trade Centre came online June 9 on WIRED, cascading onto YIMBY, Dezeen etc. Comments were mostly negative, clustering around the “universally reviled” end of the scale. I’m unsure why. At least it’s not a humungous numeral 2. Those BIG people certainly keep the stories coming, don’t they?! I wondered what it would be this time. Vernacular 3.0? Hedonistic Placemaking? Turns […]

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Moneymaking Machines #3: 625 W57th Street

Moneymaking Machines #3: 625 W57th Street
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We saw in Moneymaking Machines #1 how New York by Gehry for Forest City Ratner received the financing to make it possible in its present form only one month before the 2008 financial crisis. This window of opportunity would have closed if more time had been spent wrangling over rights of light and other issues. The Durst Organization, the developer […]

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Moneymaking Machines #2: New York by Gehry

Moneymaking Machines #2: New York by Gehry
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This post is the first of a new series about the seamy underbelly of architectural delight – where architect Tinseltown meets developer Chinatown. Expect sordid tales of greed, ambition, power, influence and betrayal. And that’s just the architects. Property developers are one of the two significant species of client not yet extinct. Clients with money, property and a desire to build are the basis for […]