Skip to content

Tag: the ever-narrowing definition of architecture


Categories:

COLOURBLIND

COLOURBLIND
Post date:
Author:

As a child I was never very good at the Ishihara Test for colour blindness and I’m no better at it now. I can’t pick the numbers in any of the below even though it’s usually screamingly obvious to anyone without a degree of male-pattern red-green colour blindness. These are the people who, when I […]

Categories:

Stock Market

Stock Market
Post date:
Author:

The life of composer, cellist, and conductor Franz Ignaz Danzi (1763–1826) overlaps those of Wofgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert. Mozart died in 1791 aged 35, Danzi in 1826 at 63, Beethoven in 1827 at 57 and Schubert in 1828 at 31. Danzi and Beethoven’s lives overlapped for all but seven years […]

Categories:

The Hexagon [a eulogy]

The Hexagon [a eulogy]
Post date:
Author:

Buildings in which we conduct our lives are mostly structures created from rectiliniar elements joined at right angles. Many find this boring – the implication being that buildings have an obligation to entertain and amuse. This leads to yet another restatement of the building-architecture divide. “Buildings are boring. Architecture isn’t.” Architecture is thus granted licence […]

Categories:

Architecture Myths #19: Popular Culture

Architecture Myths #19: Popular Culture
Post date:
Author:

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901) lived through Impressionism but, rather than taking the delicate play of light upon whatever as the subject for his art, is best known for his graphic paintings and illustrations of people in their working environments. Much of his work was for advertising. This particular poster is from 1891. This next image is possibly the first instance of […]

Categories:

The Things Architects Do #8: Themes

The Things Architects Do #8: Themes
Post date:
Author:

There’s only two and a bit chapters to go in The Autopoiesis of Architecture Volumo Uno. Every now and then I scare myself when the author inadvertently makes some terrifying kind of sense. It happened again with this bit before the penultimate chapter. It’s about projects and themes. Let me summarise – I’m getting better at it. DON’T HAVE just projects,HAVE themes as […]

Categories:

Political Correctness and Architecture

Political Correctness and Architecture
Post date:
Author:

I haven’t revisited Patrik Schumacher’s Facebook – for not since Bret Easton Ellis’ “The Informers” have I felt so unclean after reading anything. But, if nobody else is going to, I’ll have to pick him up on his misuse of the term politically correct. Here’s a man, PhD and whatever, lecturing at Princeton, 1,200-plus pages published by Wiley la-di-da. and he don’t understand […]

Categories:

Architecture Myths #13: Field Space

Architecture Myths #13: Field Space
Post date:
Author:

Field space is the (heh heh) cornerstone of Parametricism so let’s find out what it’s all about. First thing – how did fields suddenly become so cool? Classical fields are functions defined over some region of space and time. There’s gravity – described by a Newtonian gravitational field, and electromagnetism –described by electrical and magnetic fields. Here’s that magnetic field we all […]